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Executive Leadership / Driving the company towards sustainable, long-term success

John Chuang

Co-Founder and CEO
“In 1986, when I was a junior at Harvard College, two classmates and I started a desktop publishing business in our dorm room,” says John Chuang, Aquent’s CEO and co-founder. “In the early days, our company was not idea-driven but friend-driven,” Chuang explains, “That is, it ...

Steve Kapner

Co-Founder and Director
When Steve Kapner showed up at college little did he expect that random freshman rooming assignments would be the beginning of a decades-long business partnership. As it turned out his roommate was John Chuang and downstairs lived Mia Wenjen. Together the three of them launched a...

Mia Wenjen

Co-Founder
In the early days, we would hire a kid just graduating from college, hand them a key and say, ‘You’re opening the Orange County office,’ says Mia Wenjen. She’s describing the free-wheeling approach to expansion that she and Aquent’s co-founders, John Chuang and Steve Kapner, took...

Nunzio Domilici

CFO
Nunzio Domilici, the fourth employee hired by the three founders, was actually the first “temp” placed on assignment by the fledgling staffing firm back in 1987. From the outset, Nunzio has played a key role in developing Aquent’s operations. He served as VP of Finance while ...

Larry Bolick

CIO
With his mild manner, wry sense of humor, and years of experience, Larry Bolick provides the steady leadership and vision required to meet the ever-evolving technical needs of our growing, global organization. From Aquent.com, to MyAquent, our powerful extranet for Talent and ...

Mike Smith

COO
If there was a “first temp”, there had to have been a “first agent”. Indeed, the first person at Aquent (then MacTemps), to place anyone on assignment was Mike Smith, also known as “Employee #5”. Mike’s had a number of “firsts” at Aquent including opening the first branch ...

Ann Webster

President
Ann Webster began her career with Aquent by helping to establish a MacTemps office in Seattle back in 1990. “At that time, new markets were kept on a pretty short leash,” she explains, “We couldn’t even buy a water cooler for the office until we had 25 people out working!” ...